Posts

Beginner’s Guide to Cycling: Triathlon Edition

Become more comfortable on the bike with this Beginner’s Guide to Cycling

Cycling is the second leg of triathlon. There are several ways for you to become more comfortable and efficient on the bike. Casual bike riding is much different than cycling during a triathlon. Read this Beginner’s Guide to Cycling to become more familiar with what you need to know and expect. This advice will help you now and set you up for success on race day!

Understand your bike

James will tell you all you need to know about your bike.

As a first-time triathlete, you must know the ins-and-outs of your bike. This is an essential part of your training. Knowing what your bike can and cannot do is critical to your training and racing. You’ll want to understand how the gears work, get a feel for the brakes, and practice mounting/dismounting and drinking on the bike. Contact a trusted bike mechanic, like James Balentine with Velofix, for a more in-depth review of your ride and to make sure it’s ready to go. The brand that built your bike might have helpful videos to watch on their website or YouTube.

What to wear

It might make sense to wear cycling shorts on race day since you have to ride a bike during the triathlon. However, keep in mind those are designed specifically for cycling and cycling only. They’re good for training and long rides, but triathlon shorts are designed for race day and brick workouts. The fabric dries quickly which would result in less chafing. 

The helmet you wear should snuggly fit your head. You don’t want it so tight that it hurts, but you don’t want it to be loose either. Consider wearing a pair of sunglasses during training and race day. They will protect your eyes and cut down on the sun’s glare.

Know the rules

You should always wear sunglasses when you ride. Credit – Ed Sparks

Jack’s Generic Triathlon is a USAT-sanctioned event and abides by its rules. Did you know if you don’t wear your helmet when you’re supposed to, the officials can disqualify you? When you get to transition after the swim, make sure you put your helmet on and buckle the helmet strap before you touch your bike. Similarly, after you complete the ride, make sure you rack your bike before you remove the helmet.

You should also know the rules about drafting and passing. These rules are set in place to keep you and other cyclists safe. Drafting is when you use the slipstream of another rider to reduce how much energy you use. Make sure you maintain an adequate distance away from your opponents until you’re ready to pass them.

Reference this Beginner’s Guide to Cycling as much as you need. The more familiar you become the better. You’ll improve as a cyclist and make the roads a safer place. Add to your cycling knowledge and become familiar with these cycling rules of the road.

2021 Jack’s Generic Triathlon Opens Registration

2021 Jack’s Generic Triathlon plans for 18th anniversary

Registration is open for 2021 Jack’s Generic Triathlon, also known as JGT. It’s one of the longest-standing triathlons in Central Texas. It will celebrate its 18th anniversary at Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park in northeast Austin. JGT is produced by High Five Events. The event is scheduled to take place on Sunday, August 29, 2021. Participants can take advantage of Special Launch Pricing for a limited time: $89 for the sprint and aquabike and $149 for 2-3-person team relays.

“Jack’s Generic Tri was created with the triathlete in mind, but don’t let the word generic trick you,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “JGT’s race-day experience is top-notch and a major reason why it’s one of the oldest and most respected triathlons in Central Texas.”

One of the longest-standing triathlons in Central Texas

Jack’s Generic Tri has two divisions – Open Division and Age Group. Open Division allows participants to begin regardless of age, with a mass swim start. Everyone else starts the swim in their division based on their age group, with two participants entering the water every few seconds in a time trial start. The top 3 in each age group will receive an additional award. Age-group awards are given in five-year increments. Jack’s Generic Tri also awards the top athletes in the Athena and Clydesdale categories, aquabike, and relay categories.

Jacks’ Generic Tri consists of a 600m swim in Decker Lake, an 11.2-mile bike ride in a protected lane around the lake, and a 5K run through Walter E. Long Metropolitan Park. Participants will receive a custom 2021 participant tank, finisher medal, water bottle, and swim cap. After the race, everyone can enjoy the beer garden (21+), post-race food, and the signature finisher festival. Jack’s Generic Tri is a USAT-sanction event and provides professional timing and professional photography. A great volunteer crew and hundreds of supportive spectators make race day memorable for everyone involved. 

Go virtual

Triathletes who can’t make it to the event can still participate through JGT’s $40 Virtual Challenge. Participants can complete the distances on their own time at their preferred locations. Virtual challenge participants will have until September 19th to complete the distances and submit their results.

As part of the updated policies for 2021, JGT will offer free deferral to participants if a government entity issues a ban on mass gatherings due to the COVID-19 pandemic that would prevent this event from occurring.

Get Faster on Your Run with these Tips

Follow these tips to see improvement and get faster on your run

Whether you’re new to triathlon or a seasoned veteran, you will eventually want to get faster on the run. Improving the run is one way to shave minutes off your overall time! You’ll have to put in the work though. It takes hard work and dedication to increase your speed. Below are 6 different ways to help you get faster and chase those PRs. The more of these tips you integrate, the better. 

Interval training

Keep track of your time during interval workouts to maximize your workout.

This type of training includes periods of high and low intensity running. High-intensity interval involves running faster than your everyday pace. Interval training revamps the efficiency of the oxygen delivered to your body. This will help increase your speed and efficiency. The goal is to make small, incremental increases in speed over time. Try the workout below and adjust as needed.

  • Jog for three minutes at regular pace
  • Sprint for one minute
  • Repeat this cycle four more times

Pro tip: don’t skip your workouts when you use these 4 excuse busters.

Run hill repeats

These might be difficult at first, but they’re worth it. Running hills is a form of resistance training.  Look for a hill that takes you about two minutes to ascend. Run at a steady but hard effort on the way up and easy jog back down to recover. Your body will work harder, but this is a chance to work on controlling your breathing. Focus on your recovery on the downhill. Engage your core and regain control of your breathing on the way down. With hill training, you’ll increase your muscle strength, especially your glutes and calves. Those are the muscles needed to sprint across the finish line! Avoid knee pain when you run when you incorporate these tips.

Add strength training

Pushups are a great workout if you don’t have weights at home.

How you increase your speed is not just about running. You need to keep yourself active and functioning. Strength training involves exercises that improve strength and endurance. It typically involves the use of weights, but can take a variety of different forms such as bodyweight workout. Start with lighter weights gradually work your way up. If you don’t have weights at home you can still complete a workout. Incorporate pushups, dips, situps, lunges, squats, and any other exercise that uses your body’s weight.

Be steady and focused

Things take time, so don’t get off track. You won’t achieve your big goal overnight. Set up smaller, weekly goals along the way. Take it easy on yourself. Slow and steady may win the race, but fast and steady builds speed! Take challenges and try running faster than the day before. Be just as focused on your recovery as you are about getting faster on your run. Learn about the benefits of an ice bath and how it can help with your recovery process.

Try yoga

Yoga can improve your breathing, flexibility, and core strength.

Yoga has extensive benefits beyond our imagination. Add yoga to your daily or weekly training plan and you won’t be disappointed. A study showed that twice-weekly yoga sessions increase flexibility in the joints and improve the balance of your body. Deep breathing associated with yoga will also help you consume oxygen more efficiently when completing more strenuous workouts. Get started with these 5 yoga poses for triathletes.

Eat right

Eating right is crucial. Optimal fueling gives your body what it needs to improve. Plus, by eating healthier you could lose some weight and develop lean muscle. Don’t forget to hydrate!

These are some of the most tried and valued running techniques. Everyone has their unique ways to get faster on the run, so make sure you do what’s best for you. Listen to your body and don’t get too harsh on yourself. Just like training for the finish line, getting faster on your run takes time.

4 Effective Foam Rolling Tips

Recover from your workout faster with these foam rolling tips

A foam roller helps with myofascial release. Foam rolling can loosen your muscles before a workout. It can also help your body recover after a workout. The benefits of using a foam roller include: relieves soreness, helps with tight muscles, and increases flexibility.  These are the three most common issues triathletes want resolved so they can begin the recovery process and get ready for their next workout. Here are four foam rolling tips that’ll help you recover faster and be ready for your next workout. Pro tip: make sure you’re recovering effectively when you avoid these foam rolling mistakes.

4 foam rolling tips

  1. Be consistent

Consistency is key when foam rolling, just like your training.

All people who have engaged in any physical activity know consistency is key. The same is the case with taking care of your body. Foam rolling is no different. Create a plan of action, just like your training, and make foam rolling a part of your routine. This is especially true when you factor in what you ask of your body after swimming, cycling, and running. Effective recovery is just as vital as your training. Build it in before and after workouts and eventually it’ll become a part of your training plan. Track all of your training progress, including foam rolling, with one of these training apps.

  1. Focus on muscles used in workout

Foam rolling before workouts increases circulation and flexibility. It also loosens your muscles. When you foam roll afterward, it begins your body’s recovery process. Focus on sore and tight muscles, especially if they were heavily used. Foam rolling can have similar effects to a good massage. Pro tip: learn why you should add strength training to your overall plan. Don’t forget to foam roll!

  1. Roll slowly

Whatever foam roller you use, make sure you stay relaxed and roll slowly.

Don’t roll too fast is the basic mantra for foam rolling. Rolling too fast can be harmful and ineffective. Roll slow enough for the affected muscles to feel the roller and relax. Roll slowly and intentionally over specific muscles that are feeling sore. If you have a spot that is tight, spend some extra time trying to loosen the muscle. 

  1. Take deep breaths

A combination of foam rolling and deep breathing can do wonders for your blood’s circulation. Taking deep breaths can help you remain calm and relaxed. It also helps increase the circulation of blood throughout your body, pumping fresh blood to the muscles that need it most. Deep breathing can also relieve anxiety and help manage stress. 

These proven foam rolling tips will help you get the best results and expedite the recovery process. You’ll be ready to crush your next workout. Just don’t forget to foam roll before and after!

Learn How to Find Swim Goggles That Fit You Best

Everything you need to know about finding swim goggles that fit you best

A good pair of goggles is an essential item for swimming. They can make or break your swim at your big race or during your training. That’s why it’s important to find a pair of swim goggles that fit you and your needs. Durability, fit, comfort, clarity, and adjustability are qualities you should look for before purchasing a new pair of swim goggles. Different kinds of goggles provide better protection, benefits, and effectiveness depending on the type of swimming you’re doing. Find the swim goggles that fit you best with our recommendations and links below! Pro tip: if you’re just starting out keep these beginner swimming tips in mind.

Here are a few things to keep in mind

Size matters

Swimmer swimming towards the water exit at Jack's Generic Triathlon. It's important to ensure you have swim goggles that fit.

Swim goggles that fit will keep them from falling off during your swim. Credit – Ed Sparks

The most notable difference between pool goggles and tri or open water goggles is that tri goggles are bigger. They provide a wider range of vision. This feature is critical to maximize your field of vision and properly sight while looking for other athletes, buoys, and the almighty swim finish line. The same pair of goggles often come in different sizes. Make sure you get the pair that best fits you without compromising your sight. Correct fit is critical to how well the goggles will seal around your eyes and keep the water out.

Pay attention to tint

Style may be important, but you don’t want to compromise style for function. Tinted goggles may appeal to you more, but if you’re doing an open water race on an overcast day or if the water is muddy, heavily tinted goggles would hinder your vision during the swim. Plus, if you’re new to open water swimming, limiting your already hindered vision may be intimidating for most swimmers. Once you find the swim goggles that fit you best, it is a great idea to get a few pairs with different tint levels. Have it all in your swim bag so that you are ready for any situation.  

Polarized lens

These are a must for a sunny, open water swim. A polarized lens will reduce glare off the water from the sun and allow you to see more clearly. Many goggles come in both regular and polarized lenses. You should consider getting both. Use the regular lens for training and the polarized lens for races. 

UV protection

You protect your eyes during every other portion of triathlon. The swim is no exception. Typically most goggles have this feature, but make sure you look for a pair with UV protection to prevent any damage to your eyes. The sun’s rays reflect off the water and make it hard to see. Goggles with UV protection will shield your eyes from any damage. They will keep your vision manageable on sunny training or race days.

Train in the goggles you will race in

This is the best way to avoid any race-morning mishaps from keeping you from performing your best on race day. Adjust your goggles to the exact tightness you’re comfortable with to avoid your goggles from filling up with water or even falling off mid-race.

Top 5 triathlon goggle recommendations

Roka R1 Goggles

  • Patented design for greater field of view
  • UV, anti-scratch, and anti-fog coating
  • Flat silicone head strap with locking adjustment clip

Speedo Socket 2.0 Mirrored Goggles

New Wave Fusion 2.0 Swim Goggles

  • Low-profile design with streamlined shape
  • Soft, durable silicone double head straps
  • Four nosepiece options to fit all swimmers

Aqua Sphere Kayenne Polarized Lens Swim Goggles

  • Polarized lens reduces glare and increases contrast
  • Oversized lens for great visibility
  • Anti-fog and UV lens treatment for long-lasting clarity

AqtivAqua DX Wide View Swim Goggles

Now you have all the information you need to find the swim goggles that fit you best! Is a wetsuit next on your list? Make sure you know what to look for when choosing a wetsuit.

Why It’s Important to Wear Sunglasses When Riding

Protect your eyes and wear sunglasses when riding

In addition to looking cool, there are other benefits when you wear sunglasses when riding. This applies to running, hanging at the beach, driving a car, and especially riding your bike. If you have some sweet specs that make you look cool, all the better! We recommend the UA Igniter II Sunglasses by Under Armour. Learn why it’s beneficial to wear sunglasses when riding. Pro tip: follow our advice and don’t forget about protecting your skin!

Protection

Dust and debris

You will encounter visible and non-visible projectiles whether you’re riding the trails or commuting to work. Wearing sunglasses to protect your eyes from flying debris might be the most important reason. Flying debris doesn’t care if you’re riding solo or with a group. Cars kick up rocks, bugs are everywhere, even other cyclists can kick up debris on the side of the road. Dust is everywhere. It’s often stirred up by cars, other riders, or Mother Nature. Glasses won’t protect you from all the dust, but it’ll surely help. Your shades are going to get dirty. Make sure you clean them after every ride.

UV exposure

Repeated exposure to UVA and UVB radiation from the sun will have negative consequences on your vision. Protecting your eyes is critical to the short-term, and in this case, the long-term health of your eyes. Make sure your lenses are polarized and have a coating that absorbs the sun’s rays. Lenses also need to be a neutral color, not crazy tints and extreme colors. Your goal is to protect your eyes while replicating what your eyes see naturally.

Safety

A clearer view

The correct lenses will help clear your view when cycling. Cyclists have a large amount of information to process when riding. You’re watching for vehicles, intersections, signaling turns, avoiding potholes, tracking other cyclists and runners, the list goes on. Any time you can eliminate distractions you free up the ability to pay attention and process more information. Proper lenses will also help reduce the sun’s glare. Glare could shine in your eyes from street signs, windows on buildings, or the hoods of cars. Proper fitting sunglasses will also reduce the amount of wind that hits your eyes. Wind alone can cause dryness and irritation when riding.

Next time you’re on the road, grab a pair of sunglasses for your ride. Even a cheap pair will provide protection until you can get a pair that you’ll love. Taking care of your eyes now will pay dividends down the road. Make sure you’re comfortable during your ride so you can keep your eyes on the road. If you’re uncomfortable you might need to adjust your saddle height. Just a few millimeters can make all the difference!

Dryland Exercises for When You Don’t Want to Swim

Try these dryland exercises to build strength and improve your performance in the water

Training for the swim portion of your upcoming tri is always important. This workout won’t be identical to the benefits you get while actually in the water, like perfecting your form and practicing breathing. But it’s still valuable to enhancing your performance in the water. Think of these dryland exercises as a way to target the same muscle groups you would while swimming. If you’re unable to hit the pool, these exercises can keep you on track to achieving your goals. These dryland exercises focus on working your core muscles, quads, glutes, chest, arms, back, and shoulders. Just like you would in the pool or open water.

Pro tip: take these exercises to the next level when you incorporate strength training.

Burpees

A burpee essentially works all the muscles you would activate during a pool session. It’s especially beneficial to build your stamina. It’s a full body and functional exercise that works on your muscle endurance and aerobic capacity. To properly do this:

  1. Start standing with your feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Lower yourself into a squatting position and place your hands on the floor in front of you
  3. Jump your feet back, putting yourself into a pushup position
  4. Do a pushup
  5. Jump your feet back into their original position
  6. Stand yourself upright, jump into the air, and clap your hands over your head

Repeat this exercise in 3 sets of 15.

Lat pulldown

You need some weight for this upper body exercise. However, stay light and stretch your shoulders well to reduce the risk of injury. To properly do this:

  1. Sit down at a pulldown machine and place your hands wide apart on the bar, palms facing forward
  2. Bring the bar down straight down to your clavicle
  3. Keep your torso still as you pull your arms down
  4. Draw your shoulders back, pulling the bar down as you exhale
  5. When the bar touches your clavicle and your shoulder blades are completely contracted, count to 2
  6. Slowly bring your arms back up to starting position, as you inhale

Control is key during this exercise. Trying to go fast will not work your muscles efficiently and can injure you. If you keep the weight low, you can do 3 sets of 25 for this exercise. Pro tip: don’t perform the exercise too fast or too slow

Pull-ups

If you do not have access to a pull-down machine, pull-ups will also work. They’ll strengthen your back, shoulders, and arms, providing a great dryland workout. You can even use the monkey bars at a local playground for this one. To properly do this:

  1. Move your arms shoulder-width apart and grasp an overhead bar with a firm, overhand grip
  2. Hang so your arms and legs are straight
  3. Steady your core
  4. Keep your back straight and do not swing yourself
  5. Pull yourself up, so that your head is over the bar, leaving the bar at your chest
  6. Slowly lower your body back to hanging position

You should also do this same exercise with your hands gripped close together at different distances. Shoot for about 5 sets of as many proper pull-ups as your strength will allow.

Reaching lunges

This exercise works your quads and glutes. It will help you with changing direction and help you prevent injuries. To properly do this:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Step far forward with your right leg and shift your weight so that your heel hits the floor
  3. Descend until your right shin is vertical and your right thigh is parallel to the floor
  4. Lightly tap your left knee to the floor
  5. Put your weight back onto your right heel to bring yourself back upright
  6. Repeat with your left leg

When doing these exercises, keep yourself balanced. Make sure your knee is bent at a 90º angle and does not stick out further than your toe. Do 3 sets of 15 for this exercise for each leg.

T-Rotational pushups

This spin on the traditional pushup offers you a more intense workout. It provides a better core workout, while still hitting the upper body and hip extensors. To properly do this:

  1. Begin with a rigid torso in a standing pushup position with your arms and feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Descend, bringing yourself chest to the floor
  3. Start ascending until your arms are straight
  4. Shift over into a side plank position keeping your arms straight
  5. Rotate back to push up positions
  6. Repeat on the other side

Do 10 reps total, alternating each side, for 3 sets.

Incorporate these dryland workouts so you can be a stronger, more confident swimmer when you hit the water. Once you get back to the open water you might be in the market for a wetsuit. If so, keep our advice in mind when choosing a wetsuit.

What to Know When Choosing a Wetsuit

Keep this advice in mind when choosing a wetsuit

Triathletes normally wear a wetsuit during the swim portion of triathlon. They can be advantageous in the water by increasing your buoyancy. But with so many options, brands, and prices, how do you pick what’s best for you? We break down the basics and provide you with the information needed when you begin the process of choosing a wetsuit. Pro tip: once you find the perfect wetsuit use these excuse busters so you don’t skip those swim workouts!

Types of wetsuits 

A wetsuit is a neoprene insulation suit made for warmth and buoyancy during the swim portion of a triathlon. Triathlon wetsuits are different from other water sport wetsuits. They are regulated by governing bodies like USAT. Wetsuits for a triathlon cannot be more the 5mm thick. 

The two most common types of wetsuits are sleeved and sleeveless. Full sleeved wetsuits are better for colder temperatures and are the most efficient. Sleeveless wetsuits are good too, but can let in water. This can cause you to slow down. Short “jammer” wetsuits have gained popularity for short distance triathlons since they are easiest to take off. Pro tip: track your workouts with these mobile apps and see how much difference a wetsuit can make.

Fit and range-of-motion

You want your wetsuit to fit snug to your body but not restrict breathing or inhibit arm movement. Putting on and taking off your wetsuit shouldn’t be a battle. If it is, it’s too small. Additionally, it shouldn’t restrict or alter your swim motion. If it does and you continue to swim, you increase the chances of injury. When choosing a wetsuit, keep in mind that the sleeveless version can allow for better range-of-motion. Learn more about swim strokes and how they can impact your training.

Fabric

Nearly all wetsuits are made of neoprene, a synthetic rubber that contains thousands of tiny air pockets. The material is what increases your buoyancy and helps your body retain heat in cold water. Keep in mind that not all neoprene is the same. They also come in varying thicknesses. Check the wetsuit to see if it has extra fabric panels in areas near the butt or lower back. The location placement of the extra material can help you stay more horizontal and potentially increase your speed. Not sure where to start when choosing a wetsuit? Check out some of our recommendations.

Cost

Wetsuits can be a big investment, costing anywhere from $100 to $1000. In terms of cost, sleeveless is usually less expensive. Less expensive wetsuits will also usually have uniform neoprene. High-end suits will vary across the body and incorporate more technology into the fabric. Become familiar with the range of options and designs for all brands and price levels. Just like most things, options that were once available in higher-priced wetsuits have made their way to less expensive options. Don’t want to buy one brand new? Check with local stores to see if they rent suits. You can also find second-hand wetsuits through Facebook groups like Tri ‘n Sell It.

The Benefits of Being a USAT-Sanctioned Triathlon

Learn about the benefits of Jack’s Generic Tri being USAT-sanctioned and having a USAT-certified race director

When researching triathlon events, you’ve probably come across the terms USAT-sanctioned and USAT-Certified Race Director. So what exactly do these terms mean and why should you care about the benefits of a USAT-sanctioned event?

USAT-sanctioned

USAT is an acronym for USA Triathlon, which is the governing body of the sport of triathlon in the United States. Additionally, since triathlon is a sport featured in the Olympic games, USA Triathlon is part of Team USA. Therefore, they must adhere to the rules and guidelines of the US Olympic and Paralympic Committees. When you see the phrase “This is event is sanctioned by USAT” or “This event is USAT-sanctioned” it means that the event organizer has completed a thorough questionnaire regarding how they plan to conduct the event. They have also received approval from the USA Triathlon Events staff. As a potential participant in a triathlon, the term USAT-sanctioned should give you confidence. You are registering for an event that meets minimum standards for safety and fairness.  

Participant benefits

As a participant in a USAT-sanctioned event, you must have a current membership with USA Triathlon.  Annual memberships and one-day memberships (purchased per event) are available. Most adult triathlons in the United States are sanctioned by USA Triathlon. This helps the individual event. It also helps keep the national governing body strong so that it can support race directors, growth of the sport initiatives, and Olympic and Paralympic athletes.

USAT-Certified Race Director

Additionally, USA Triathlon has created a Race Director Certification program that goes above the standard sanctioning process. Race Directors who choose to become certified go through approximately 16 hours of coursework and complete an exam. They are required to recertify every two years and complete a background check through NCSI and take SafeSport training. The recertification and coursework ensures that the race director remains current in their knowledge and engaged in the triathlon community.  There are two levels of Race Director Certifications. Level II is the most difficult to obtain and retain. Only the most qualified race directors reach this level. Dan Carroll of High Five Events was among the first race directors to achieve Level II certification. He has maintained that certification since the program was created in 2007.

So the next time that you register for a triathlon like Jack’s Generic Tri, look to see if the event has the benefits of being USA-sanctioned and if it is produced by a Certified Race Director. That way you’ll know you’re safe in good hands and you’re in for an awesome experience!

Reasons Why You Should Include Strength Training

Reap the benefits when you include strength training

Strength training is an underrated physical activity that has a lot of advantages. Some people think it is a physical activity that is meant for bodybuilders and weight lifters, but that’s not true. Everyone should include strength training to their overall plan. You’re asking a lot from your body when you think of all the swimming, cycling, and running. When you include strength training, you’re giving your body the strength it needs to do what you want it to do. Below are 4 reasons why you should include strength training. Pro tip: train smarter with some of our favorite apps.

Become stronger

Getting stronger occurs whether you use weights or complete exercises using your body weight. The great thing about getting stronger is it doesn’t have to cost you anything! Your body needs a foundation to build upon when you begin training. Increasing your strength will give you the ability to complete all that your training plan calls for. Pro tip: you have to put in the work! Use these 4 excuse-busters and don’t skip your next strength workout.

Prevent injuries

Overuse injuries occur when you complete the same act repeatedly. Give overused muscles a rest when you include strength training. Various exercises, like lunges and squats, can help strengthen your lower body and allow your upper body to rest (if you completed a swim workout the day before). Conversely, push-ups, dips, or rows can strengthen your arms and allow your lower body to rest. Pro tip: here are some additional tips to avoid knee pain.

Improve your endurance

As you get stronger, you’ll improve your endurance. You teach your body to go further and further when you include strength training. The stronger you become, the more power your body will have to swim, bike, and run further than the week before. 

Stay fit

You don’t have to train for a certain event to include strength training. Use it as a means to stay fit. You can maintain your foundation of strength by focusing at least 10 minutes on your core and 10 minutes on your upper and lower body. This allows you to keep swimming, cycling, and running so that you’re ready for your next event. Pro tip: eating healthy helps you stay fit too. Make sure you’re eating your greens with these healthy recipes.

The benefits of strength training can be enormous, especially when paired with these 8 habits of a successful triathlete. It all depends on how much you invest from a time standpoint. But the great thing about increasing your strength is you don’t need heavy weights or expensive equipment. You can do sit-ups, push-ups, squats, lunges, mountain climbers, and anything else you think of from the comfort of your home. Include strength training and establish the foundation needed to stay fit, prevent injuries, and get stronger.