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Dryland Exercises for When You Don’t Want to Swim

Try these dryland exercises to build strength and improve your performance in the water

Training for the swim portion of your upcoming tri is always important. This workout won’t be identical to the benefits you get while actually in the water, like perfecting your form and practicing breathing. But it’s still valuable to enhancing your performance in the water. Think of these dryland exercises as a way to target the same muscle groups you would while swimming. If you’re unable to hit the pool, these exercises can keep you on track to achieving your goals. These dryland exercises focus on working your core muscles, quads, glutes, chest, arms, back, and shoulders. Just like you would in the pool or open water.

Pro tip: take these exercises to the next level when you incorporate strength training.

Burpees

A burpee essentially works all the muscles you would activate during a pool session. It’s especially beneficial to build your stamina. It’s a full body and functional exercise that works on your muscle endurance and aerobic capacity. To properly do this:

  1. Start standing with your feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Lower yourself into a squatting position and place your hands on the floor in front of you
  3. Jump your feet back, putting yourself into a pushup position
  4. Do a pushup
  5. Jump your feet back into their original position
  6. Stand yourself upright, jump into the air, and clap your hands over your head

Repeat this exercise in 3 sets of 15.

Lat pulldown

You need some weight for this upper body exercise. However, stay light and stretch your shoulders well to reduce the risk of injury. To properly do this:

  1. Sit down at a pulldown machine and place your hands wide apart on the bar, palms facing forward
  2. Bring the bar down straight down to your clavicle
  3. Keep your torso still as you pull your arms down
  4. Draw your shoulders back, pulling the bar down as you exhale
  5. When the bar touches your clavicle and your shoulder blades are completely contracted, count to 2
  6. Slowly bring your arms back up to starting position, as you inhale

Control is key during this exercise. Trying to go fast will not work your muscles efficiently and can injure you. If you keep the weight low, you can do 3 sets of 25 for this exercise. Pro tip: don’t perform the exercise too fast or too slow

Pull-ups

If you do not have access to a pull-down machine, pull-ups will also work. They’ll strengthen your back, shoulders, and arms, providing a great dryland workout. You can even use the monkey bars at a local playground for this one. To properly do this:

  1. Move your arms shoulder-width apart and grasp an overhead bar with a firm, overhand grip
  2. Hang so your arms and legs are straight
  3. Steady your core
  4. Keep your back straight and do not swing yourself
  5. Pull yourself up, so that your head is over the bar, leaving the bar at your chest
  6. Slowly lower your body back to hanging position

You should also do this same exercise with your hands gripped close together at different distances. Shoot for about 5 sets of as many proper pull-ups as your strength will allow.

Reaching lunges

This exercise works your quads and glutes. It will help you with changing direction and help you prevent injuries. To properly do this:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Step far forward with your right leg and shift your weight so that your heel hits the floor
  3. Descend until your right shin is vertical and your right thigh is parallel to the floor
  4. Lightly tap your left knee to the floor
  5. Put your weight back onto your right heel to bring yourself back upright
  6. Repeat with your left leg

When doing these exercises, keep yourself balanced. Make sure your knee is bent at a 90º angle and does not stick out further than your toe. Do 3 sets of 15 for this exercise for each leg.

T-Rotational pushups

This spin on the traditional pushup offers you a more intense workout. It provides a better core workout, while still hitting the upper body and hip extensors. To properly do this:

  1. Begin with a rigid torso in a standing pushup position with your arms and feet shoulder-width apart
  2. Descend, bringing yourself chest to the floor
  3. Start ascending until your arms are straight
  4. Shift over into a side plank position keeping your arms straight
  5. Rotate back to push up positions
  6. Repeat on the other side

Do 10 reps total, alternating each side, for 3 sets.

Incorporate these dryland workouts so you can be a stronger, more confident swimmer when you hit the water. Once you get back to the open water you might be in the market for a wetsuit. If so, keep our advice in mind when choosing a wetsuit.

What to Know When Choosing a Wetsuit

Keep this advice in mind when choosing a wetsuit

Triathletes normally wear a wetsuit during the swim portion of triathlon. They can be advantageous in the water by increasing your buoyancy. But with so many options, brands, and prices, how do you pick what’s best for you? We break down the basics and provide you with the information needed when you begin the process of choosing a wetsuit. Pro tip: once you find the perfect wetsuit use these excuse busters so you don’t skip those swim workouts!

Types of wetsuits 

A wetsuit is a neoprene insulation suit made for warmth and buoyancy during the swim portion of a triathlon. Triathlon wetsuits are different from other water sport wetsuits. They are regulated by governing bodies like USAT. Wetsuits for a triathlon cannot be more the 5mm thick. 

The two most common types of wetsuits are sleeved and sleeveless. Full sleeved wetsuits are better for colder temperatures and are the most efficient. Sleeveless wetsuits are good too, but can let in water. This can cause you to slow down. Short “jammer” wetsuits have gained popularity for short distance triathlons since they are easiest to take off. Pro tip: track your workouts with these mobile apps and see how much difference a wetsuit can make.

Fit and range-of-motion

You want your wetsuit to fit snug to your body but not restrict breathing or inhibit arm movement. Putting on and taking off your wetsuit shouldn’t be a battle. If it is, it’s too small. Additionally, it shouldn’t restrict or alter your swim motion. If it does and you continue to swim, you increase the chances of injury. When choosing a wetsuit, keep in mind that the sleeveless version can allow for better range-of-motion. Learn more about swim strokes and how they can impact your training.

Fabric

Nearly all wetsuits are made of neoprene, a synthetic rubber that contains thousands of tiny air pockets. The material is what increases your buoyancy and helps your body retain heat in cold water. Keep in mind that not all neoprene is the same. They also come in varying thicknesses. Check the wetsuit to see if it has extra fabric panels in areas near the butt or lower back. The location placement of the extra material can help you stay more horizontal and potentially increase your speed. Not sure where to start when choosing a wetsuit? Check out some of our recommendations.

Cost

Wetsuits can be a big investment, costing anywhere from $100 to $1000. In terms of cost, sleeveless is usually less expensive. Less expensive wetsuits will also usually have uniform neoprene. High-end suits will vary across the body and incorporate more technology into the fabric. Become familiar with the range of options and designs for all brands and price levels. Just like most things, options that were once available in higher-priced wetsuits have made their way to less expensive options. Don’t want to buy one brand new? Check with local stores to see if they rent suits. You can also find second-hand wetsuits through Facebook groups like Tri ‘n Sell It.

You Need This Essential Triathlon Equipment Checklist

Pursue your love of triathlons the right way!

It’s never a good idea to wait until a couple of weeks or days leading up to your next tri to get all your necessary gear together. We’ve created a checklist of the essential triathlon equipment you’ll need to be a pro triathlete in no time.

Bike

Choose the best bike for youSimple enough, but one of the most important pieces of equipment you’ll need. You can’t complete a triathlon without a bike. From tri bikes and road bikes to mountain bikes, hybrid bikes, and cruisers, we’ve seen just about everything on the JGT course. Whatever kind of bike you have will be just fine for your next tri. Whether you’re currently in the market for one or are looking to improve your current ride, here are some suggestions for your perfect ride.

Pro tip: You can always rent bikes to test it out before you buy.

Helmet

Arguably the most important piece of equipment you will need for a triathlon. A safe tri is a fun tri, so it’s important to make sure you have a helmet that protects you. The fit of your helmet is crucial in the case of an accident. It is also a good idea to make sure you test them out in person to ensure a correct fit before purchasing your helmet.

Running Shoes

Running shoes are a must. It takes time to figure out what will make the run portion the most enjoyable and painless for you. Everyone is different and has different needs when it comes to a running shoe, so make sure you’re choosing the perfect pair of shoes. Hopefully, by now you already have a favorite pair or have a pair on the way, and are ready to take on the JGT run course. Pro tip: It’s a good idea to wear your running shoes to the race, to avoid forgetting them along with all your other essential tri gear.

Swim Goggles

Of course, you need goggles for the swim portion. Open water swimming tends to frighten people, so it will make you feel better to be able to see while completing the swim to see the buoys. Also, depending on the weather race day, choose goggles with the appropriate amount of tint to avoid hindering yourself during the swim portion.

 

Swim Cap

Swim caps are great for eliminating drag and increasing your speed in the water. JGT provides our participants with a bright colored swim cap specific to your age group to keep the groups together and help with the time trial swim start. Per USAT rules, swim caps are required for safety purposes to be able to identify swimmers in the water.

Pro tip: Wear two swim caps on race day with your goggles in between the two. It will prevent any sort of slipping your goggles may encounter.

Swimsuit or Tri Suit

A standard swimsuit can come in a one-piece or two-piece. You will need to come prepared with a pair of cycling shorts after you complete the swim if you opt for the swimsuit. Then there is a tri suit. A tri suit can also be in one or two pieces, but the bottoms resemble cycling shorts. The key difference here from a wetsuit is the pad included for cycling is not nearly as thick. Find what you’re most comfortable in to be ready for your next triathlon. Lastly, if you plan on doing your training in a pool, the chlorine can damage your suit. It’s always a good idea to have one you train in, and one designated for race day.

We advise shopping around before you make your purchase regarding these different pieces of essential triathlon equipment. Everyone has their preferences, so take some time to guarantee you get the equipment best for you and your body.